Moving On? Here are 5 Things You Can Do to Heal Your Broken Heart

Are you at a point in your life right now where you feel so heartbroken? It just hurts so much that you don’t know how to pick up the broken pieces and heal the pain?

In Japan, broken things like pottery are often repaired with gold—an art form known as Kintsugi. It is meant not to hide the flaws, but to emphasize them as a beautiful part of the pottery’s history.

If you are going through a heartbreak, this practice of mending broken things sends a message you might benefit from: Your heart can mend. And as you go through your healing process, you can come out stronger, resilient, and more beautiful.

Grow through your grief! Here are 5 things you can do to heal your broken heart:

1. Grieve properly

Some people grieve too long, some don’t grieve enough. Either one can hurt the healing process.

While there is no certain timeframe for grieving, it’s best to give yourself enough time to recuperate emotionally and physically. Allow yourself to process the loss and truly feel your emotions without feeling any guilt.

Healthy grieving, according to University of Washington, gives you the ability to remember the importance of your loss—but with a newfound sense of peace, rather than searing pain.

2. Accept the loss

Are you still looking for explanations on why the relationship ended?

Truth is, there’s no breakup reason that’s going to feel satisfying. No reason can take away the pain you feel, so don’t force yourself to search for one. Accept that it’s over. Accept that the person is gone. Accept the reality, then put the questions to rest so you can start moving on.

To fully accept and move on, Help Guide suggests that you understand what happened and the part you played.

Ask yourself: How did you contribute to the situation? Do you tend to repeat the same mistakes? How do you deal with conflicts and stress? How could you act in a more constructive way? Are you in control of your feelings or your feelings control you?

Rediscover yourself and learn important lessons that could make you a better person.

3. Forgive and ask for forgiveness

They say, if you never heal from what hurt you, you’ll bleed on people who didn’t cut you.

If you don’t forgive the person for the things they did against you, you will internalize those thoughts and most likely, project those hurts onto other people who are not responsible for the pain you’re experiencing.

In his book Forgive for Good, Dr. Frederic Luskin noted that learning to forgive improves psychological and physiological wellness. The forgiver becomes emotionally stronger, more confident, and more optimistic.

As you forgive the person who hurt you, it’s also helpful to forgive yourself for the not-so-good things that you might have contributed to the relationship. Forgive yourself and ask God to forgive you as well.

4. Invest in yourself

Insomnia. Isolation. Intrusive thoughts. Immune system dysfunction.

A heartbreak is a psychological wound, but it impacts life in many ways. In fact, a study titled Anatomy of Love found out that 40% of brokenhearted people experience clinically measurable depression.

You might be feeling intense emotions currently, but now is the time to care for yourself more. Invest in your physical, mental, and spiritual health. Reestablish who you are and what your life is about. Carve out time for your family and friends—in things that bring you joy and purpose.

This is your season of exploring new things, of investing in your self-growth. This is an end as well as a beginning.

5. Receive God’s healing

Right now, you might feel as if the relationship has left a void in your life.

Thankfully, God can fill any void. So, pray. Talk to your Heavenly Father and surrender your brokenness to Him, so you can receive the healing and comfort that you need.

It’s one of the best things about God: He offers love to anyone who has experienced rejection, betrayal, and hurt. He is not just close to the brokenhearted—He binds up their wounds.

Just like how the art of Kintsugi binds broken pottery and gives it new worth, Jesus Christ collects all your broken pieces and puts them back together. Allow God’s love and strength shine through those cracks, so you—and the people who witness your healing—could experience His glory.

“But he said to me, ‘My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness.’ Therefore I will boast all the more gladly of my weaknesses, so that the power of Christ may rest upon me.” (2 Corinthians 12:9 ESV)

Are you looking for a song that would capture the feels as you reflect and heal?

Pansumandali is your wonderful reminder that though people and feelings come and go, God’s love is constant. Pre-save the song now and stream it this February 14.

Follow Reverb Worship PH on FacebookInstagram, and YouTube for more updates.

Experiencing Pandemic Stress? Here are 5 Tips to Cope

Imposed quarantines from time to time, news about the rise and fall of COVID-19 cases here and there, plus health and safety reminders everywhere. Can you believe that the world has been battling this pandemic for over a year and a half now?

How are you holding up?

If these unsettling scenarios stress and fill you with anxiety, know that God wants you to be free from all worries (Psalm 34:4).

God gives you the power to break free from stress!

You can manage your pandemic stress! Here are essential tips from inspirational speaker and Beyond Small Talk guest, Carl Pascua.

Tip #1: Slow down and rest

Did you find yourself feeling extra stressed when the pandemic started? You are not alone. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says it is natural to feel stress, anxiety, grief, and worry during the pandemic.

Perhaps, uncertainty becomes the gasoline that fuels your stress fire.

Don’t worry. You don’t need to force yourself to be okay all the time. Carl suggests that you process your emotions. Take time to figure out where the sadness or stress comes from and take a much-needed rest.

Tip #2: Exercise and stay healthy

Science has long proven that your mind and body are strongly linked.

“Remember, a healthy body can result into a healthy mind and a good emotional condition,” Carl reminds.

The American Psychological Association support’s Carl’s assertion and states that as your mental health declines, your physical health can worsen, and if your physical health declines, you can feel mentally “down.”

So, get off the couch and start a simple exercise routine. Also, be extra mindful of what you eat!

Tip #3: Talk about your problems

Whether it’s with a family member, a trusted friend, or a mentor, sharing your thoughts and concerns with other people can help relieve stress.

Likewise, you can help others feel that they’re not alone, too!

Like you, each person you know could be fighting a battle you don’t know about. So don’t hesitate to reach out. Encourage each other and build each other up! (1 Thessalonians 5:11 NLT)

Tip #4: Let go of the idea about control

Who would’ve thought that by 2020, going to malls, restaurants – or even work – could be a health risk? Who would’ve thought that by the summer of 2021, you would still be cooped up in your home and praying for a pandemic to end?

No one.

But it happened. This goes to show that no matter what your plans are, you cannot control everything. Ease your pandemic stress by letting go of your need to control things, and trusting in Someone greater who is always in control – Jesus Christ.

As Proverbs 19:21 ESV puts it, “Many are the plans in the mind of a man, but it is the purpose of the Lord that will stand.”

Tip #5: Put your faith in Him

If anything, the pandemic proved the famous saying, “Everything changes, except the word change.”

If you put your happiness and trust in things that change – like your career, health, or even relationships – you might feel stressed when things don’t work out the way you had hoped they would. It’s high time to put your joy and faith in a God who never changes.

“Other people may not understand everything that is going on in your life, but God knows. That means you can go to Him, cry to Him, and you can seek help from Him. Problems can be big, but our God is bigger, our God is stronger!” Carl concluded.

No matter what you’re going through, keep going! You can always find comfort and overcome through the help of your merciful God!

“In the multitudes of anxieties within me, your comforts delight my soul.” (Psalm 94:19 NKJV)

Do you feel overwhelmed or stressed?

We are here for you. Call the CBN Asia Prayer Center at 8-737-0-700 and we will pray for you.

Mark your calendars and catch the next webisode of Beyond Small Talk this Saturday, December 11, 2021, at 7:00 PM, on The 700 Club Asia Facebook page and YouTube channel!

3 Ways to Prevent Violence Against Women

Violence against women is one of the most prevailing and pressing issues today, according to Commission on Population and Development (POPCOM).

Your mother, sister, daughter, niece, or any woman around you could be a victim of gender-based violence.

The World Health Organization (WHO) consider violence against women as a major clinical health problem and, at the same time, a public concern since it is a violation of women’s rights.

With these disturbing facts, there is no better time but now to advocate ending violence against women.

The change starts in, and with, you. Here are some ways you can help prevent violence against women:

1. Educate yourself

Before anything else, you must learn more about the violence happening to women.

You may start by understanding these different forms of violence against women.

Generally, gender-based violence happening today can be in the form of physical, sexual, and emotional abuse.

Aside from this, you can also read more about specific types of violence happening around the world.

UN Women identified these forms of violence on women that you should know:

Domestic violence – known as intimate partner violence, and is one of the most common forms of violence on women

Femicide – intentional killing of women because of their gender

Sexual Violence – can be in the form of sexual harassment, rape, corrective rape, and rape culture

Human Trafficking – exploitation of people by force, deception, or coercion of women

Female Genital Mutilation – causing injury to genital organs of women

Child Marriage – making girls below 18 years old become child brides

Online or Digital Violence – cyberbullying, non-consensual sexting or sending explicit messages, and doxing or releasing the information of victims online are a few of the forms of violence on cyberspace

By learning about the forms of violence on women, you can now better understand the experiences of the survivors.

This way, you too can help to prevent violence from happening to you or your loved ones.

2. Listen to the voices of survivors

It’s difficult for a woman to share her story of the violence inflicted on her. Listen to them when they find the courage to speak up and help her break the cycle of violence in the community.

Victim-blaming is never a right thing to do, especially in these kinds of cases. UN Women highlighted that the perpetrator is the sole reason there is violence against women.

Establish a safe space for every woman who experienced this kind of violence by starting a conversation with them.

Women are now speaking up. They need someone to listen to them, and that is you.

Very Well Mind identified believing and validating the victim’s feelings are crucial to your conversation with them.

Let them know that you believe them, and it is not their fault they experience such kind of violence.

Moreover, help them understand that experiencing violence is never normal and seeking help is the best way to end the cycle of abuse.

When you listen to their stories with empathy, you can better understand this advocacy of preventing these acts of violence to happen again.

3. Speak out about violence against women

Listening to their stories is just the first step towards ending the violence.

There may be women who are starting to speak up for themselves, but there are a lot more who are suffering abuse alone.

One of the ways you can help them speak out is by offering them specific support. Look up contact details of authorities who can help them get away from the perpetrators.

As much as you can be an ear to listen to them, pray for them. You can also be their hands and feet when they cannot reach out for help.

You can be their voice when they cannot speak for themselves.

Even the Bible tells us to speak for those in need.

“Speak up for those who cannot speak for themselves; ensure justice for those being crushed.” (Proverbs 31:8 NLT)

Ending the violence against women is possible with you and each of every person who are willing to stand up and speak out.

If you are a survivor of violence in the past, and you are now in the process of recovery from that trauma, allow us to comfort you in prayers.

Feel free to call the CBN Asia Prayer Center at 8-737-0-700 or send your prayer requests to our Facebook page.

You are not alone. We are here for you.

how to overcome back to work anxiety

5 Tips to Overcome Back-to-Work Anxiety

For nearly two years since the onset of the pandemic, you are probably one of the employees who have been working from home.

But just recently, with the easing of COVID-19 restrictions and the continued vaccination efforts of the government, going back to the office became a talk among employees.

According to Anxiety and Depression Association of America, as much as employees love to reunite with colleagues, transitioning to face-to-face work may induce anxiety among them.

An article published by the University of California featuring an interview with a psychologist points out that people who are coming out to work onsite are concerned about their safety against the virus, new onsite setup, financial adjustments, and personal issues at home.

Do you also have the same concerns?

Here are some tips to help you overcome your anxiety about going back to the office and continue to work joyfully:

how to overcome back to work anxiety

Tip #1: Acknowledge your anxiety

It all starts with accepting that you are having anxious thoughts about transitioning to onsite work.

Identify where the anxiety is coming from. Maybe it’s because of health concerns, financial adjustments, or location.

To cope with your anxiety, try breathing exercises. The quiet time will help you process your overwhelming thoughts and release the negativities cluttering your head.

how to overcome back to work anxiety

Tip #2: Voice out your concerns

After clearing your mind from anxious thoughts, you may still have some second thoughts about reporting back to the office due to personal reasons.

It’s time to analyze your situation. List your concerns and discuss them with your supervisor. Schedule a one-on-one conversation with them to not only share your concerns but to also walkthrough the policies and precautions prepared for onsite workers.

Be transparent about your concerns, whether they are emotional, mental, physical, or financial reasons.

Through this conversation, you and your employer can come up with possible solutions such as a hybrid work setup as you adjust to the new policy.

how to overcome back to work anxiety

Tip #3: Develop a new routine

As much as some people are given the freedom to choose their work setup, not all jobs are suitable for flexibility.

Another way for you can overcome your anxiety about going back to the office is to develop a new routine.

Psychiatrist Renju Joseph of Priory Hospital suggests adjusting your daily routine days or weeks before the first day of your onsite duty to help you adjust easier.

Try to still schedule the habits that you used to do while working from home. Maintain a schedule where you are available for doing workouts, visiting your mini garden, or simply reading books.

You can always find time for the things you love.

Tip #4: Maintain minimum health standards

Aside from adjusting your schedule, practice minimum COVID-19 health precautions while at home for a seamless transition to onsite duty. To ease your worries, come prepared.

Cleveland Clinic advises that you continue to practice social distancing—and let others know that you do. Wear a face mask, and bring hand sanitizer with you at all times.

When you continue to practice these health precautionary measures, you not only ease your anxiousness but also the worries of others within your department while working onsite.

how to overcome back to work anxiety

Tip #5: Pray for protection

Most of all, be still before God and pray. Surrender all your anxious thoughts to Him, and let Him do His part. Rest your heart knowing that He is in control of your life and in all situations.

Before you step out from your home, pray for God’s protection to be with you in your commute and work inside your office.

You can always rely on God, so be at peace!

“When I am afraid, I put my trust in you.” (Psalm 56:3 NIV)

how to overcome back to work anxiety

Do you still feel anxious about working back in your office?

Let us pray for you. Call CBN Asia’s Prayer Center at 8-737-0-700 anytime.

And if you want to experience the fullness of God’s protection, visit this page to start your journey of faith today.

How to Support a Loved One with Mental Health Problems – Beyond Small Talk

Mental illness could happen to anyone and it could be difficult to recognize.

Unlike a physical wound that is easy to spot, mental illness is an internal war hidden behind a smile, a hello, and the telltale phrase, “I’m okay.”

According to Mayo Clinic, some of the warning signs you should watch out for are “excessive fears or worries, or extreme feelings of guilt, significant tiredness, low energy, and inability to cope with daily problems or stress.”

If you recognize these symptoms in a friend, colleague, or family member, check out these tips from Beyond Small Talk hosts Peter Kairuz, Sonjia Kakilala and psychotherapist Alain Dizon to know how you can better support them in this journey.

1. Make the person feel that nothing has changed

You might feel awkward when approaching them, but try to relax. Make them feel that you’re the same person they have known and you still see them the same way. Create a safe place for them to unload and share their struggles without judging nor condemning them.

2. Ask them how you could help

It’s okay to be honest and to admit that you don’t know what to do. Ask them how you could help. Always take the cue from the person.

Tell them your limitations and boundaries when helping, but assure them that you’ll journey with them to recovery.

3. Learn how to listen

Avoid acting like an expert by trying to fix your loved ones’ problems. What they need are your heartfelt presence and listening ear to make them feel that you genuinely care.

Also, don’t force them to speak if they are not yet ready to open up. Just make yourself available whenever they are comfortable to finally talk.

4. Educate yourself

One of the biggest challenges that people with mental illness have to deal with is stigma. Educating yourself will help you to better relate to them and provide the best assistance.

Did these tips help you? Feel free to comment on the online discussion and make sure to catch the next webisode of Beyond Small Talk! Watch it next Saturday, October 23, 2021, 7:00 PM, on The 700 Club Asia Facebook page and YouTube Channel!

Also, we would love to pray for you and your loved ones who are suffering from mental health problems.

Call 8-737-0-7-00 if you’re in Metro Manila. If you’re outside Metro Manila or the Philippines, contact us through CBN Asia Prayer Center.

3 Self-Care Practices for a Healthier Body, Soul, and Spirit – Beyond Small Talk

Taking care of your overall well-being is integral to being a healthy and productive person.

It enables you to be more productive, it boosts your immune system, enhances your self-esteem, and improves your compassion towards others, says Katherine Hurst of The Law of Attraction in her article What Is Self-Care And Why Is Self-Care Important?.

But then, a lot of people still think that self-care is being selfish and inconsiderate.

In this webisode of Beyond Small Talk, hosts Peter Kairuz, Sonjia Calit, and Zenia Panahon discuss the importance of self-care. They also share tips that you can apply to have a healthier body, soul, and spirit.

1. Learn to listen to your body

Are the pressures of life crushing you down? Swamped by your daily tasks and cannot function well?

Be sensitive to detect the messages that your body sends to you.

“Self-care is not being selfish, it is being healthy,” Zenia Panahon emphasized.

Can you hear your body groan and complain? It’s okay to take a step back and retreat.

2. Set aside some time for yourself

Stress is everywhere. It is inevitable.

You need to find some time to slow down, clear your thoughts, and get replenished. You may try meditating, take a 10-15 minute walk every day, or clean and declutter your desk.

According to Zenia Panahon, “Self-care routines vary for different people. It still depends on what works for you and what recharges you.”

3. Make a habit of spending time with God.

Dedicate a time for just you and God.

Say a word of prayer, give thanks to Him, and read what He wants to say to you through His Word.

You can come to God in all your brokenness. Allow Him to make you whole and to comfort you while in the midst of your raging sea of stress and negative emotions.

Peter Kairuz says it beautifully, “When God comforts you, it’s all-encompassing. It’s not just your spirit, but your body benefits from that moment with God.”

If you’re suffering from mental illness, Beyond Small Talk is here for you and ready to listen.

Do not hesitate to join our online discussion and share your struggles with us.

You may also call the CBN Asia Prayer Center at 8-737-0-700 and we would love to pray for you.

For more inspiring content and practical tips, catch the next webisodes of Beyond Small Talk every Saturday, at 7:00 PM at The 700 Club Asia Facebook page and YouTube Channel.

10 Common Myths on Mental Health Problems Debunked – Beyond Small Talk

Judged. Mocked. Discriminated.

These are real battles people with mental illness deal with every day because of stigma from society.

In fact, the Department of Health, as cited by Philippine Star in their article DOH: It’s time to talk about, address depression made an alarming statement, “We need to start talking about depression to end the stigma surrounding mental health because, when left unattended, it can lead to suicide.”

You can help your struggling friend, workmate, or family member with mental health problems. You just have to be willing to learn, unlearn, and relearn hard truths about it.

Take time to check out these 10 common myths on mental illness debunked by Beyond Small Talk hosts Peter Kairuz, Sonjia Calit, and Zenia Panahon.

Myth #1: Mental health problems can only be experienced at a certain age.

Truth: Mental health problems could manifest at any age. According to Mayo Clinic in their article Mental illness in children: Know the signs, like adults, children can also develop the same mental illness such as anxiety disorders, Schizophrenia, and Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Myth #2: People with mental health problems are violent and unpredictable.

Truth: Not all who people who have mental health problems act violently. It still varies on the condition and MentalHealth.gov says in their article Mental Health Myths and Facts, “only 3%–5% of violent acts can be attributed to individuals living with a serious mental illness.”

Myth #3: People with mental health problems cannot deal with jobs and/or school.

Truth: There are people with mental health issues who are highly functional and productive members of society. This is why you should be sensitive to  signs of mental illness in your loved ones.

Myth #4: Personality flaws are often cause of mental health issues. You could snap out of it over time.

Truth: Mental health issues can be sourced from different factors such as genetics, environment, socio-economic standing, and temperament, says Zenia Panahon.

Also, you can’t snap out of it. You need professional help and ongoing family support which are both vital toward healing from mental health issues.

Myth #5: Once you experience mental health problems, you will never get out of it.  

Truth: Mental illness is treatable. If you seek help and gain support, you can recuperate from it.

Myth #6: Taking medications is the only answer.

Truth: Some recover from mental health issues solely with the help of friends, family, and mental health professionals, but there are others who also need medication.

Myth #7: It is impossible to prevent mental illness.

Truth: You cannot really control life’s trials and challenges, so there are times that it may push you to your limit.

But, Mayo Clinic explained in Mental Illness that “If you have a mental illness, taking steps to control stress, to increase your resilience and to boost low self-esteem may help keep your symptoms under control.”

Myth #8: Mental illness is a form of brain damage.

Truth: Brain damage is physical. Mental health is how you feel, behave, and think as a person.

Myth #9: I can’t do anything for people who have mental health issues.

Truth: You can do something about it by being a good support system to them. Show your support by learning how to deal with your loved ones who have mental health issues and accompanying them when seeking professional help, Zenia Panahon explained.

Myth #10: If I seek help, others would think I’m crazy.

Truth: When you seek help, you are investing in taking care of yourself, says Zenia Panahon.

Do you still have questions and clarifications?

Join the online discussion and don’t miss the next webisode of Beyond Small Talk this Saturday, October 16, 2021, at 7:00 PM, on The 700 Club Asia Facebook page and YouTube Channel.

If you’re facing an overwhelming barrage of challenges because of the pandemic and don’t know how to handle it, we want to pray for you. Just call the CBN Asia Prayer Center at 8-737-0-700.

3 Things You Must Do Before Casting Your Vote – Beyond Small Talk

Now that election day is getting closer, we see more and more campaign ads on public spaces and media outlets.

Candidates all over the country are putting their best foot forward to prove to Filipinos that they deserve a seat in the national and local government.

While their attributed charisma and campaign jingles make them look convincing, these political publicity stunts should not be the only guide to making your decision on whom to vote.

Your vote matters. So, here are 3 things you must do before casting that crucial vote next election as advised by Beyond Small Talk hosts Peter Kairuz, Jericho Arceo, and Paul Herrera.

1. Research the candidate’s background.

There’s more to campaign materials than meets the eye. Of course, candidates will not show you their weaknesses and wrongdoings. It’s your responsibility to do your research.

Look at their political records, leadership skills, and where they stand on important issues. Among other things, these will help you weigh whether he/she is qualified for the position they are running for.

2. Assess candidate’s character.

You wouldn’t want to vote for a leader who is just eloquent in speech. Instead, look for a leader who has integrity, commitment, faithfulness – one who stays true and fulfills his/her promises, and someone who would be always available in times of need.

A leader who serves and sacrifices for the good of his/her people just like how it was demonstrated by Jesus, the greatest leader of all time, is worth our vote.

3. Pray before you vote.

Above all else, seek for God’s wisdom and discernment. Make a decision to fervently pray for the right candidates for the position because your vote determines the direction of the future of our country.

In 2 Chronicles 7:14 ESV, it says, “If my people who are called by my name humble themselves and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven and will forgive their sin and heal their land.”

Follow this prayer with us:

“Lord, we come humbly before Your throne today. We acknowledge Your sovereignty and power over our beloved nation, the Philippines. We know that when we pray, You hear us. So with confidence, we ask for a safe and peaceful election process. We ask for divine encounters for our government and future leaders, and wisdom to every Filipino voter. May You hold everything in the palm of Your hands. We ask all these in the Mighty Name of Jesus, Amen!” 

Let us know what you think about these tips. Don’t hesitate to join our online discussion and catch the next webisode of Beyond Small Talk this October 16, 2021, 7:00 PM, at The 700 Club Asia Facebook page and YouTube Channel.

Frontliners, How’s Your Mental Health? Here are 3 Essential Tips for You

The brave first responders. Modern-day heroes. Frontliners.

Healthcare and essential workers are praised and given these names, and it’s only right to honor them. They put their lives on the line to treat overwhelming numbers of COVID-19 patients. They serve for long hours while most of them live in isolation from their loved ones. They care for people’s needs and keep the country going.

If you are a frontliner, thank you for doing what you do!

Despite these various roles, we acknowledge that you might also be struggling with fear, anxiety, and uncertainty. If you feel stressed and overwhelmed during this challenging season, take this time to breathe.

We are here to pray for you. And here are 3 tips to take care of your mental health, if you need them:

Tip #1: Make time for yourself

Everyone is battling the COVID-19 pandemic in their own different ways. But we can’t imagine how difficult it is for frontliners like you.

At the end of the day, you can only fulfill your heroic duties if you are your own hero. So, carve out time for self-care. Prioritize sleep, commit to regular exercise, and eat healthy. Relax a little! Listen to music, watch a film or a cat video. Do activities that soothe your mind.

Also, give yourself credit, the Mental Health First Aid suggests. Appreciate the important work that you’re doing and give gratitude to yourself.

Tip #2: Talk to other people

Whether it’s a family member, a friend, or a mental health professional, sharing your thoughts and concerns to other people you trust is good for your mental health.

By talking to others, you can make them feel that they’re not alone! You can encourage each other and build each other up! (1 Thessalonians 5:11 NLT)

Also, talk to the people you work with. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, communicating with your coworkers and supervisors helps you cope with difficult situations and become resilient. If you have concerns about yourself and your job, talk openly so they can help you.

Think about what works best for you and don’t hesitate to ask how you can access mental health resources in your workplace.

Tip #3: Lean on God

Other people – including the ones closest to you – may not understand everything that’s going on in your life, but God knows.

If you feel that the stress and pressure are too much to handle, pause and pray. You can always come to God because He is your ever-present help (Psalm 46:1). That means you can talk to Him, cry to Him, and ask for His strength and comfort.

Keep going. Keep praying. God is with you every step of the way!

“Do not be afraid or discouraged, for the LORD will personally go ahead of you. He will be with you; he will neither fail you nor abandon you.” (Deuteronomy 31:8 NLT)

Do you feel stressed or overwhelmed?

Do you need someone to talk to?

We would love to support and comfort you through prayers. Call the CBN Asia Prayer Center at 8-737-0-700 and our trained prayer counselors will pray for you.

Myth and Facts about suicide

Myth or Fact? Debunking 5 Common Myths People Believe about Suicide

Let’s start with a fact.

The latest figures from the Philippine Statistics Authority showed that suicide rate increased by 57% in 2020 compared to the previous year. Suicide took the lives of 4,420 Filipinos — the highest in 14 years!

Despite these alarming numbers, a lot of misconceptions and stigma still surround the topic of suicide. Common labels are applied to suicide victims, survivors, bereaved families, and to people who struggle with suicidal thoughts.

Stigma, or the fear of being stigmatized, prevents most people with suicidal thoughts from seeking life-saving help and treatment. Survivors bottle up their shame because they worry about how they would be seen by their loved ones and society. People who have lost someone to suicide experience more rejection, shame, and blame than other bereaved people.

Misconceptions on suicide also result in uncertainty in others about how to approach and help someone through their pain. So survivors of suicide, people suffering with suicidal thoughts, and even those who have lost loved ones are often left isolated and unsupported.

This is why it is important to shed light on any stigma as they can result in terrible consequences. Let’s take a look at some common myths surrounding suicide and uncover the truths behind them:

Myth and Facts about suicide

Myth #1: Suicidal people are just looking for attention.

Fact: People who have suicidal thoughts need help.

Attention and help are drastically different from each other. Having suicidal thoughts indicates that a person is facing mental or physical health challenges, according to Medical News Today. It’s not a need for clout or attention – it is a clear sign that that person needs help.

Here’s another alarming truth: People who talk about suicide sometimes act on it. In fact, the World Health Organization says that majority of suicides have been preceded by warning signs, including verbal or behavioral red flags.

So, when you or someone you know is thinking or talking about suicide, take it very seriously.

Debunking 5 Common Myths People Believe about Suicide 1

Myth #2: Asking someone if they are thinking about suicide will make them do it.

Fact: Talking openly and carefully about suicide can prevent it.

Due to stigma about suicide, many people are afraid to speak up. However, talking about suicide could be a huge relief for those who are struggling. As Nevada’s Suicide Prevention Office puts it, talking about suicide provides the opportunity for communication.

Simple questions like “Are you having suicidal thoughts?” or “What are the reasons why you don’t want to live anymore?” can spark life-saving conversations.

Myth #3: Only people with mental health conditions develop suicidal thoughts.

Fact: Anybody can develop suicidal thoughts.

Suicidal thoughts and actions can affect people of all ages, genders, life status, or health conditions. It is pervasive. It touches everybody, depending on their life situation.

As stated by the National Alliance on Mental Illness, many individuals with mental illness are not affected by suicidal thoughts. Likewise, not all people who attempt or die by suicide have mental illness.

Myth #4: People who attempt suicide are selfish.

Fact: People who attempt suicide think about their loved ones.

Often, people attempt suicide because they mistakenly think that they’re a burden to others. They worry about hurting their family and friends, so they try to shoulder their pain as best as they can.

But as they’re clouded by feelings of hopelessness, they tend to conclude that their loved ones are better off without them.

Believing that “suicide is selfish” stops the conversation. As Healthline suggests, keep the conversation open by reassuring people with suicidal thoughts that they aren’t a burden and that help and support are available.

Myth # 5: People who have suicidal thoughts are lacking in faith.

Fact: Suicidal thoughts can affect anyone, even people of faith!

Due to the notion that suicide is an unforgivable sin and that feeling hopeless somehow translates to a lack of faith, believers who struggle with suicidal thoughts feel shame and hesitate to seek help.

While it’s true that hope, healing, and comfort come from God (Exodus 15:26), mental health struggles are real, too. Even the people God had worked with in the Bible were afflicted with suicidal thoughts.

Elijah (1 Kings 19:4) and Jonah (Jonah 4:8) wished to die, while King Saul (1 Samuel 31:2-5) and Samson (Judges 16:23-31) perished at their own hands. These stories are evidence that suicidal thoughts can affect anyone.

Suicidal thoughts do not determine a person’s faith and eternal destiny. However, it affects those who are left behind. Bereaved families are left seeking for answers, comfort, and hope.

Thankfully, the Word of God offers a hope-giving promise to everyone affected by suicide: Nothing can separate a believer from the love of Jesus Christ.

“For I am sure that neither death nor life, nor angels nor rulers, nor things present nor things to come, nor powers, nor height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord.” (Romans 8:38-39 ESV)

Debunking 5 Common Myths People Believe about Suicide

If you or someone you know is struggling with suicidal thoughts, we encourage you to seek professional help and support from your family and friends. Call emergency hotlines such as Hopeline Philippines’ 24/7 hotlines: 0917-558-4673 (Globe), 0918-873-4673 (Smart), 02-88044673 (PLDT), 2919 (toll-free for Globe and TM).

We are also here to join you in prayers. Together, let’s lift your concerns to God. Call the CBN Asia Prayer Center at 8-737-0-700.